How does a serous membrane envelope an organ?

How does a serous membrane envelope an organ? The serous membrane is made of two layers of mesothelium joined by a layer of loose connective tissue and sitting on a basal lamina. An internal visceral layer surrounds the organs, while a parietal layer forms the walls of the body cavities. The serous membrane generally forms an airtight seal around the body cavity.

How does a serous membrane envelope an organ What is its function? Serous membranes secrete a slight amount of lubricating fluid. This allows the layers of the pleura, pericardium and peritoneum to move in relation to each other, and hence provides a certain amount of mobility to the ensheathed organs (resp. lung, heart, intestine). The secreted fluid is called serous fluid.